THE SOUNDS, SIGHTS, & SIGNIFICANCES OF EASTER

Brookside sunrise

How will you experience Easter? How will resurrection be made known to you? How will you see it? What will it sound like? In what context and at what time will you find it? With whom will you encounter it? Where will Easter happen for you this year?

These and a host of other questions float around in my mind every year as the premier day on the Christian calendar approaches. And in response to such queries, a host of affirmations, meditations, and ruminations are bubbling up. Perhaps you will resonate with the following:

Easter sounds like birds on a fresh spring morning as new life is burgeoning forth. Easter looks like babies, brand new and curious about the whole world set before their grasp. Easter feels like a blanket, warm and comforting, reassuring that goodness is real.

Easter is where there is hope after a disaster, and the charge sounds forth to carry on after presumed defeat. Easter happens when a community begins to approach the fulfillment of justice in their midst through a community benefit agreement for a public works project. Easter is when old opponents are reconciled and new friendships are celebrated. Easter is proclaimed in Handel’s victorious “Hallelujah” chorus and in the wistful tones of a country singer plaintively, delicately singing “Softly and Tenderly Jesus Is Calling.” Easter is shiny shoes and new clothes and chocolate eggs and parents sitting children down for a talk about the “real reason” for all the festivities.

Easter happens in the hospital operating room as doctors and nurses and other staffers work their wonders to save life and give new leases on life to so many. Easter happens when a community begins to approach the fulfillment of justice in their midst through a community benefit agreement for a public works project.

Easter occurs when families make life-changing decisions about how they will increase intimacy and thoughtfulness in their homes.

Easter takes place in a CEO’s office when the CEO discovers — really, finally discovers — that the real “capital” of any enterprise is the group of people who work not merely for the company but mostly for the betterment of their families.

Easter is enacted when a youngster decides to follow Jesus of Nazareth for the first time and when an oldster decides to follow again in the footsteps of the Master.

Easter looks like the smiling faces of homeless persons who have been treated as equals and have been welcomed to sit at the table of grace, where they hear “red, and yellow, black and white, they are precious in God’s sight” and they know that the song applies to every human being on the face of the earth, including themselves.

Easter tastes like fresh baked bread, broken and shared between one who has nearly everything they need and another who has hardly anything they can claim as their own.

Easter is … like a budding flower, like three-part harmony, like a plumb line that is true and undeniable, like a friendship that never fades, like forgiveness that sets us free.

Easter feels like a strong wind at your back, and sounds like a symphony of the world’s greatest music, and feels like the clutch of a child’s hand, and looks like the face of someone who is surprised to learn to that God’s grace really is the foundation of life.

– Bob Hill